Nea community grants

Without the internet around to provide an unbroken timeline of artistic events to a potentially endless landscape of wandering eyes, records that couldn’t achieve access to a viable fanbase in the 1980s have mostly, inevitably found themselves buried in the sands of time forever. Many creative masterworks, no matter how well-appreciated at the time of their initial pressing — if mismanaged by independent, boutique labels that couldn’t stay afloat financially — have either approached or gone completely off the cliff edge of existence. But thanks to the interplay between user-submitted content on the web and the way platforms help listeners discover it, some records do actually manage to climb back out of the sand.

I’ve always been a vinyl lover. The entire time I spent digging through crates or discovering new music through online channels, I kept thinking the same things:

Music therapy nih

The word “hemiola” originates from the Greek words “hemi,” meaning half, and “holos,” meaning whole. In other words, one and a half. And so, a hemiola is a rhythmic pattern that uses a ratio of three to two, and the Greeks, ever concerned with ratios, noticed that three divided by two gives you one and a half, thus their description “hemiola.”

In 1972, John Fogerty left Creedence Clearwater Revival and their label, Fantasy Records. After he released his hit solo album Centerfield (1985), label head Saul Zaentz of Fantasy Records sued Fogerty for plagiarizing himself. Zaentz claimed that the single “The Old Man Down the Road” infringed upon “Run Through the Jungle,” a song that he had originally recorded with CCR under contract with Fantasy Records in 1970. Though he was not found guilty, it’s pretty novel that Fogerty was sued for sounding too much like himself!