Gangsta rap artists

It’s totally fair to assume this song is in C minor. Sure, C minor chords shows up here and there, and much of the melodic content could be attributed to the C minor pentatonic scale. I wouldn’t blame anyone for thinking this song is in C minor.

It absolutely could make “lazy” DJs better selectors, however, that is not our focus. We want to help people become better listeners and help them identify and understand the music they actually love, so they can confidently find more of it.

Like everyone in the music biz, mixers and producers have a reverence for the giants whose shoulders they stand on. We love to learn from the greats and, in this book, journalist and engineer Howard Massey sits down with 37 of them to record their hard-won insights. From Sir George Martin to Phil Ramone to Alan Parsons, we’re treated to intimate insights into how these producers makes great records and what makes each of them tick. Many of the common lessons here we knew already — such as the importance of getting the best performance over fixing things during the mixing process — but there’s real value in the way that these sentiments and lessons are articulated differently by each interviewee.

Gangsta rap talk

For example, in Spotify for Artists, you can see detailed stats for your top 200 songs. You can filter by date range to see whether certain promotional efforts or live shows have correlated with your Spotify activity. You can also track the total streams and listeners of all of your tracks, combined (but note that this “all-time” graph can only go as far back as 2015).

Whether you are a seasoned songwriter or you have just recently begun to write your own music, an important part of songwriting involves being self aware. Knowing what makes you tick will spur your creativity in new and unexpected ways. What kind of music do you enjoy listening to? How does your taste in music reflect the style of songs that you want to craft? How do certain grooves and tonalities make you feel? Which events and stories from your own life or the lives of others around you inspire you? These are all questions for self reflection while trying to write music.

“This Is America”: We’ve found the first of this year’s modulating pop tunes: changing from a gospelly F major to what I hear as E♭ Phrygian, which happens whenever Gambino shoots someone (in the video). I hear it as Phrygian because of the shark-in-the-water E♭ and E (or “F♭” if you’re being kosher theory-wise), and then the high-pitched whistle being a solid B♭, so there you go: E♭ Phrygian. Elements from the two tonalities fuse in places, like at 1:35 where there’s what sounds like a sample of previous F major vocals that drone on the very-not-Phrygian notes A and C, creating a heavy tension. This fusion is also present in the outro. Rhythmically, watch out after the second chorus, where it sounds like they added or skipped a beat, but they didn’t. It all flattens out after a few thumps. 

I love whenever I get to talk about punk rock. Two people recommended I write about this performance, so I did a little research, and this is what I found (read a fuller synopsis here):

For me, one way to do this is to pick a certain amount of time and decide I’m going to do focused practice for that length of time. Even better if I have concrete goals laid out for that time, such as “play the left hand to ‘Stompin’ at the Savoy’ successfully six times in a row.” When the time limit is up, I can happily jam around on whatever I want and let my mind wander whither it will.

Mc hammer 80s rappers

On this day, 57 years ago, James Brown and his Famous Flames recorded what would become one of the most earth-shattering funk and soul albums of all time.

Finally, don’t apply blending effects (reverb, chorus, delay) too heavily in the mix as they may stand out much more noticeably after mastering boosts volume and brings out details in the sound.

Student-Artist: Lisa Reshkus

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I often use the live remote broadcasting server ipDTL. This service costs as little as $160 a year and allows me to record on their server, giving me the option to record someone wherever they are. I strongly recommend, however, you take the audio output of your computer (your remote guest’s audio feed) and record it into the software you use, protecting you from any potential data loss if the internet goes down.